Black and White and Read All Over

Gallery Exhibition/Event
Posted on December 6, 2010

Exhibition Explores a Riddle, the News, and a Play on Words.

January 6 through February 23, 2011
Opening Reception: Thursday, January 6, 2011, 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm

San Francisco, December 6, 2010 This lively and diverse group exhibition at Creativity Explored Gallery presents imaginative compositions created by using black, white, and red, and often the daily news as background and inspiration. The humorous old riddle”from which the show takes its title”provided a jumping off point for a number of the artists whose work will be on view to express their interest in the daily news and to incorporate it into their art works. Other artists explored the aesthetic boundaries inherent to working with just three colors, while yet others limited their palettes to black and white. Exhibited work includes mixed media, collage, drawings, paintings, and ceramics.

According to Geri Montano, artist, Creativity Explored art instructor, and curator of the exhibition, the idea for the subject of the show came about as a result of having observed that the newspaper is an ever-present item in the Creativity Explored studio. “œMany artists bring the paper in with them each morning and discussion of articles is a vehicle for sharing information and social interaction. During the World Series, the conversation among Giants fans about the sports pages was particularly animated,”  she said. For Montano, who works in mixed media herself, the idea of curating a show that incorporates news-related themes and news clippings was a natural step.

Badia Forbes is among the artists who incorporate actual elements of the newspaper into their compositions.  Working in acrylic on canvas, her boldly painted black and red line portraits include wedge-shaped snippets of horoscopes, which she uses as decorative components that also delineate the features of her subjects. Her work has a simple but sophisticated nostalgic quality  that is hard to place; however the fact that Forbes is inspired by Modigliani may explain her figurative style and the non-contemporary look of her subjects. A stand-out work by Forbes, a six-panel composite portrait, is also a tribute to Modigliani in that she has accented the work with snippets of articles about the artist.

Gordon Chin, a Giants fan, also incorporates newspaper elements into his compositions. Working with the theme of baseball, his medium-format mixed media collages incorporate photo-copied material about the Giants. In one example, Chin has used a photograph of the body of a Giants player to which he has added a playfully-drawn pen an ink face that may be a self-portrait. A clipping of game stats positioned in one corner of the sheet completes the work. Another scene, of a dugout, includes drawings of baseball bats and mitts, news clips about the Giants, and a baseball that appears to be flying out of the stadium on a course marked by a large red arrow. The baseball is hand-stitched in red twine by Chin, who learned to sew for this project. Another hand-stitched baseball appears in “œBaseball Head,”  a child-like stylized drawing of a figure in a Giants shirt with a baseball for a head, this time with a pen and ink drawn face in addition to the red stitching.

Taking a more minimalist approach to the theme of the show, Selene Perez has produced two elegant, signal works in black and white. Both are large format, black ink paintings of herons. In one work a beautifully positioned single bird makes up the composition. Poised with its wings spread, it could either be about to take flight or to have just landed. Its body and its wings are rendered in  loosely-drawn, washy clouds of ink that artfully suggest ruffled feathers, while the head and feet are detailed and tightly drawn. Perez’s other painting depicts a glorious flight of about 40 small herons sweeping across the sheet from the lower right corner to the upper left one. Each bird has its individual identity, with the angled position at which its head and feet are held contributing to a sense of personality. As in the large, single bird of Perez’s other painting, all the birds in this work have tightly-drawn heads and feet, and spontaneously rendered washy smudges of ink for wings and bodies.

 

Mary Belknap also puts into practice the color theme of the show, using black and red ink and red acrylic paint for her large and small format abstract drawings. In her densely-layered large format work, she has laid down an intricate base of fine, one-inch long black lines, arranged into rectangular fields that are placed both vertically and horizontally to cover the entire surface of the sheet. This delicate black and white field”which suggests the lines and columns of newsprint if it were seen at a distance great enough to blur the lines”has then been overlaid by Belknap with an elaborate pattern of fine red circular lines and small dots rendered in red ink and acrylic paint. The overall effect, in a play on words of the title of the show, is of an artwork that is black and white and red all over. Belknap’s two small format works are simpler compositions. Here, she has covered the entire sheets with an intense, deep red acrylic wash and used white pastel and black ink to create an overlay of decorative detailing. The resulting effect in the two works is one of both richness and simplicity.

Thomas Pringle employs the show’s color theme as well, but to an altogether different effect. In “œDevil Woman,”  a compelling 22 x 36 inch portrait, his subject is placed against a black trapezoid-like background and looks out at the viewer with a mischievous challenge in her eyes. Drawn in strong lines of charcoal and enhanced with heavy layers of deep red watercolor, the woman’s face and figure have the skewed geometry typical of Pringle’s portraits. Here, the combination of the subject’s level, ambiguous gaze and the repeated V-shaped patterns of the red horns that she wears on her head, the shape of her mouth, and the neckline of her dress produces an image full of punch and vitality.

Calendar Listing

Black and White and Read All Over

GROUP EXHIBITION AND OPENING: Exhibition Explores a Riddle, the News, and a Play on Words

What

This lively and diverse group exhibition at Creativity Explored Gallery presents imaginative compositions created by using black, white, and red, and often the daily news as background and inspiration. The humorous old riddle”from which the show takes its title”provided a jumping off point for a number of the artists whose work will be on view to express their interest in the daily news and to incorporate it into their art works. Other artists explored the aesthetic boundaries inherent to working with just three colors, while yet others limited their palettes to black and white. Exhibited work includes mixed media, collage, drawings, paintings, and ceramics.

When

* Opening Reception: Thursday, January 6, 2011, 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
* Exhibition Dates and Times: January 6 through February 23, 2011; Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday from 10:00 am to 3:00 pm, Thursday from 10:00 am to 7:00 pm, and Saturday from 1:00 pm to 6:00 pm.

Where

Creativity Explored Gallery, 3245 16th Street at Guerrero Street, San Francisco CA 94103

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Press Contacts

Michael Korcek
michaelkorcek@creativityexplored.org

 

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