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An interview with Board President Sara Davis

Posted on September 27, 2011

What first attracted you to CE?
I would frequently pass CE and see the window displays. After time, I had to go in and see what it’s all about. Also, I previously worked at an organization that serves people with developmental disabilities, and they had a small art program. When I came to CE, I knew a lot about the field, but I’d never seen the art and disability niche filled so well. CE reaches people with developmental disabilities in a way that is very respectful to the artists.

What do you enjoy most about serving on the CE board?
Being a board member at CE, there’s a sense you’re making a tangible difference. The board is an active, engaged board. It doesn’t feeling like a formality, it feels meaningful. Meeting the artists and being part of the inner workings feels like you’re part of something significant. An added perk is that I can’t think of a better place to have meetings than the studio!

If someone were totally unfamiliar with CE, how would you describe it to them? 
It’s a super creative arts organization that works with artists with developmental disabilities who get to express themselves through all different mediums. The public can purchase art affordably, and there’s something in CE art that you don’t usually get from standard art experiences.

What are you most excited about for CE’s future during the time you’re president? 
It feels like an exciting turning point in terms of how we reach different constituencies: partnering with other organizations similar to us by hosting an Art & Disability Conference, reaching folks who might be interested in licensing and using CE art, connecting with art patrons and donors. There’s a lot of energy and interest in connecting with the world around us.

What is your favorite CE memory?
The Porchlight Storytelling Series was really inspirational to me and at that point I was already on the board.  I left feeling reinvigorated. I loved that artists, staff and a volunteer all shared their different perspectives. I left thinking, “I can’t believe I get to be part of such a great organization.”

Do you have CE artwork in your home? 
Unfortunately I don’t have enough wall space to have a lot of CE art at home, but I do have two large pieces in my office at work. They make a great conversation piece! Most recently, I did add a CE artwork to my daughter’s room, right above her crib. There’s something really touching about seeing my baby stare at CE art.  

What has been your favorite CE exhibition?
The super hero one curated by Francis Kohler: Super Heroes Super Villians. I felt like it was a very thoughtful perspective on identity - how people identify themselves and change themselves. All the artwork was very insightful, and you could see each artist’s interpretation of his/her personal identity.

 

How would you describe your taste in visual art?
I used to work at Adobe and since then I’ve been really interested in the intersection of film and art and how technology is being used. One of my favorite organizations is Global Lives Project. They create art installations that highlight the lives of different people simultaneously.  It captures the similarities and differences of people from all over the world.

How do you express yourself creatively?
I used to paint regularly, but now as a busy new mom all my supplies are in the garage. I like to think of art as a way of expressing your state of mind. You don’t have to be a trained artist for the art to be an expression of who you are. Art in the traditional formal context doesn’t resonate with me because art is so subjective. To me it’s all artistic expression. As my little girl gets bigger, I’m looking forward to exposing her to art. I’ll probably be pulling the paint supplies out of the garage when she gets older. 

Image: Super Heroes by Laron Bickerstaff © 2007 Creativity Explored.

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